We are facing up to Coronavirus, but still active

We had our first working day of the Coronavirus Era yesterday. We had our coffee break outside on the tables, for the first time this winter, and even then we spread ourselves out widely.

But we were all there!

Some of us will not come to the Tuesday work days for the time being, but will come at other times, and we will liaise by email as to what needs to be done, what to harvest.

We did have quite a large harvest this week as you can see from my boxes. That was partly finishing off some of the last season’s veg to make room for new planting, like last bits of the brussels sprouts plants, and some cabbage fragments. Also, the leeks are beginning to bolt, so we did a very large harvest of them. Not many of them left now.

Beautiful midwinter work day on the Farm

The weather was mild and windy, the sky was blue, with low clouds whizzing along under a higher layer of slower clouds. Working on Diss Community Farm was a wonderful way to spend a few midwinter hours.

We had quite a full turnout of our regulars, and our usual excellent coffee and cake. We had a good harvest for midwinter, leeks, sprouts, salads, broccoli, red cabbage, and did quite a bit of useful work, weeding, preparing our no-dig beds for planting, layering the compost piles.

A fine Spring day in the school holidays

We had a lot of people out today, including several children (and grandchildren) because it is a school holiday and also one dog.

We all enjoyed the warm sunshine, and got a lot of work done. We had some yummy cake and brownies with our coffee.

You can see how well the new crops are coming along in the beds and the polytunnels, so we had a nice Spring harvest.

It’s certainly spring but there are still some frosty overnight temperatures.

Raspberry canes have been cut down and, with the help of children (off-school as it’s the Easter holidays), new strings have been added for support, in anticipation of a good crop.

Manure has been added to more patches and then rotovated in.

Of course weeds are growing, frost or not; careful weeding is needed on the patch of tiny onion shoots.

Brassica stems are removed and more broad beans sown, to replace those that vanished from an entire patch; a new problem, possibly mice?

Blackcurrant and worcesterberry bushes are in flower and yet again, we thankfully have boxes of produce to take home.